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After housing animals during Waldo Canyon Fire, sanctuary fears closing its doors

By KRDO.com Staff
Published On: Nov 06 2012 05:05:34 PM CST
Updated On: Nov 06 2012 06:06:37 PM CST

The Black Forest Animal Sanctuary said it housed dozens of animals during the Waldo Canyon Fire, but the cost associated with this and the rising cost of hay is causing the sanctuary to run out of funds to stay open.

The Black Forest Animal Sanctuary said it helped to provide shelter to dozens of animals displaced because of the Waldo Canyon Fire.  While several of the animals’ owners made some contributions, the organization took a hit.

“We did end up using a lot of our own feed.  Some of the owners did come back and bring us some hay and different feed, but in the end we still took a loss,” said Daniel Andrews, ranch manager of the sanctuary.

Andrews said this coupled with the rising costs of hay as a result of the recent drought has made for tough financial times.

According to Andrews, the sanctuary does not receive much in the way of government funding, and instead relies heavily on donations.

Andrews said it costs between $4000 and $5000 to feed the nearly 100 animals housed at the sanctuary; this does not include any veterinary and miscellaneous costs.  He said the donations received have only amounted to about $200 to $300, which is not enough to cover the expenses.

“We’ve been looking at how to cut back operations, how to trim back what we can.  Unfortunately, just over the last few months, we’ve had to make harder decisions and now we’re to the point where we might just have to shut down,” said Andrews.

In the event of a shut down, Andrews said the sanctuary would have to find homes for all of their animals.  He said it would try to find good homes and adopt the animals out, but worst case scenario would include taking the animals to an auction.

“The absolute worst option is to send them out to auction.  We don’t like to do that because we don’t know where they’re going to go from there,” he said.

Andrews explained to KRDO Newschannel 13 that some of the animals are older or have medical conditions which make them harder to find adoptive families for.

“In the big picture, we’ve got enough hay to go through end of November before we have to make some decisions.  Then by the end of December, we’ll be completely out of feed,” he said.

The sanctuary said they are in need of anything from money to feed, and they said there is no donation too small.

The sanctuary said they also need volunteers.

To learn more information about volunteering or to make a donation, visit the sanctuary’s website.

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