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Mother continues looking for son's killer 10 years later

By Michelle San Miguel, Multimedia Journalist - Pueblo Chieftain Bureau/Telemundo Anchor, michelle.sanmiguel@krdo.com
Published On: Mar 13 2013 12:19:19 AM CDT

Mom continues searching for justice

PUEBLO, Colo. -

A mom is still searching for justice. Her son was murdered a decade ago in Pueblo. Derrick Wagner was 23 years old when he was gunned down in his apartment.

This week marks 10 years since Derrick was murdered. His mom, Susie, says there are people in Pueblo who know who killed him. After all these years, she is still hopeful that someone will come forward.

Susie no longer walks many places alone. She says she can't. "I've had a couple panic attacks at the grocery store and stuff so I don't go anywhere really by myself except back and forth to work," Susie said. "Somebody has to know and so subconsciously you're constantly looking around at people, you know, does that person know?"

In 2006, Willie Robbins stood trial for Wagner's murder, but a jury found him not guilty after just three hours of deliberation. They said there was a lack of evidence against Robbins.

"We still firmly believe that the shooter in this case was Willie Robbins," said Andrew McLachlan, deputy chief of investigations.

Susie is determined to put the person responsible behind bars for her son's death. She's hanging up posters around Pueblo. She hopes the $20,000 reward encourages someone to step forward. For now, a lack of evidence and witness credibility stands in the way of any further investigation.

"When some of your main witnesses refuse to testify, it becomes difficult and other ones that basically have a criminal record or have credibility issues, the jury has to weigh all of that when they're making a decision," McLachlan said.

Derrick was one of four boys and the only one who lived in Pueblo. Susie wants nothing more than to lock up the person who killed her son, but it's been more than five years since police received any new leads.

"We all hear about rest in peace. Is he at rest? Is he? I just don't know," Susie said.

The Wagners say technology has changed over the last decade and say there was evidence police could not examine 10 years ago that they might be able to process now.

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