Colorado Springs
49° F
Mostly Cloudy
Mostly Cloudy
Advertisement

Prison officials shuffled Evan Ebel's gang prior to murder

By Lindsay Watts, Weekend GMC Anchor/Target 13 Investigator , l.watts@krdo.com
Published On: Mar 24 2013 10:45:08 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 24 2013 11:57:21 PM CDT

Sources tell ABC that investigators are looking into whether the murder of Colorado Prison Chief Tom Clements could have been a hit ordered from behind bars.

EL PASO CO, Colo. -

Sources tell ABC that investigators are looking into whether the murder of Colorado Prison Chief Tom Clements could have been a hit ordered from behind bars.

The prime suspect in the murder Evan Ebel, a 28-year-old parolee, belonged to the white supremacist prison gang 211 Crew. Ebel was shot and killed by police in Texas after a car chase Thursday.

Law enforcement officials tell our sister station KMGH that about a month before Clements murder, Colorado prison authorities attempted to break connections in the gang because Clements wanted to dilute the group's power. Members were moved around to different lock-ups.

"We're trying to follow every possible lead," Gov. John Hickenlooper said Sunday. "We know Evan Ebel was connected to this white supremacist group and so we're trying to get all the information we possibly can on why he did what he did."

Meanwhile, Ebel's mother is sharing more about her son's life on her blog.

"When Evan was about 6, he would go with me to hand out food or clothing to homeless people in Denver," wrote Jody Mangue, describing young Evan as funny, full of energy and a lover of animals.

Mangue described how Ebel drifted into a dark period after his 16-year-old sister was killed in a car crash in 2004.

"He was the protective big brother and in this case, was unable to protect her. His life deteriorated after that and he just became numb and lost his direction altogether," wrote Mangue.

Mangue  writes that she's trying to make sense of what happened.

"As parents, we do our best and it is not an easy task, but I know both our children were very loved, adored and most of all they knew this from the beginning of their lives to the end," she writes.

Advertisement