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Animal Rescue says pony's life in jeopardy because of neglect

Published On: Jul 20 2014 11:41:56 PM CDT
Updated On: Jul 20 2014 11:43:55 PM CDT

Black Forest Animal Sanctuary said a pony its caring for may never recover from problems it's developed because of neglect.

BLACK FOREST, Colo. -

Black Forest Animal Sanctuary said a pony its caring for may never recover from problems it's developed because of neglect.

Black Forest Animal Sanctuary said the 14-year-old Sinatra did not receive veterinarian or farrier visits for more than a year. A farrier specializes in equestrian hoof care, trimming hooves and horse shoeing. 

Sinatra's hooves were so long they caused severe pain and problems in his alignment and tendons. A farrier has already visited him once and made Sinatra special shoes to add cushion to his healing hooves.

He is being cared for in a rehabilitation pen at the animal sanctuary.

"He spends a lot of time laying down because of the pain in his foot, it gives him some relief," said volunteer Melissa Cox. 

Cox helped rescue Sinatra. She said his owner lost her job, and couldn't afford care for Sinatra. Cox said it is heartbreaking to see animals like Sinatra.

"The economy has been bad for everybody, but its especially bad on the animals because they are the last to get what they need and proper care," said Cox.

The animal sanctuary will cover the pony's extensive and expensive treatment. Cox said in the past, it would dip into its emergency funds to cover the costs. However, the animal sanctuary's donations have dried up because of the economy and the Black Forest and Waldo Canyon fires.

"Those people are using what they would have donated, to help put themselves back, either their family members or their direct households," said Cox.

Cox pointed to an empty wall along the side of the barn Sunday. She said hay used to be stacked all the way to the rafters. Now, there is a small pile in the corner. Cox expects it will only last through August.

Cox said Sinatra's visits with the farrier cost around $300 and he needs that care every six weeks. He could eventually be up for adoption. However, there is also a chance Sinatra won't recover from problems and might not pull through.

 "It's heart breaking and its just the thought that its just a careless act," said Cox.

Sinatra will need a minimum of one year of rehabilitation.

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