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Doctors have strong opinions regarding vaccinating children

Published On: Mar 17 2014 07:16:09 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 17 2014 07:32:30 PM CDT

Vaccinating children is a heated topic that brings strong opinions from both sides.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

Vaccinating children is a heated topic that brings strong opinions from both sides.

There is a bill being debated in the Colorado House that would make it difficult for students to go to school if they are not immunized.

Dr. Candice Koch believes the body should heal itself.

“I do have a couple kids who have been vaccinated and then they notice that there is a change of behavior or possibly the nervous system has been impacted in some way, usually in a negative way,” she said.

Koch said there are ingredients in vaccines that shouldn’t be in your body.

“The chicken embryo and the aborted fetuses that you are injecting into the child in my opinion are not worth the risk,” she said.

If the bill passes, parents who don’t want their children to be vaccinated, for personal reasons, will have to be informed about the benefits and risks of vaccination.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says Colorado has the sixth highest rate of non-vaccinated kindergartners in public school, which is about 3,000 students.

The proposal would require schools and child care facilities to disclose how many kids are not vaccinated.

It passed through a House committee 9-2 on Thursday (3/17/14).

Supporters said the law is needed because of a whooping cough outbreak.

Colorado is one of 18 states to allow parents to refuse vaccinations if it violates their personal or religious beliefs.

El Paso County Medical Director Bill Letson said if your child isn't vaccinated, everyone is in danger.

“Every single person who doesn't immunize their kid can put the whole community at risk it what it comes down to,” he said.

Letson said natural remedies help the body, but they’re not enough.

“It won't necessarily protect you from something like measles or whooping cough or tuberculosis since that's transmitted through the air,” he said.

Parents who refuse to give their kids vaccines because of religious or medical reasons are not affected by the bill.

The House will debate the bill this week.

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