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El Paso County DMV seeing high demand for new car titles

By Joe Dominguez, Multimedia Journalist - Pueblo Chieftain Bureau , j.dominguez@krdo.com
Published On: Jan 09 2014 07:35:58 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 09 2014 09:36:47 PM CST

Governor John Hickenlooper announced Wednesday he wants to upgrade DMV offices statewide. Meanwhile title requests have increased in El Paso County over last year.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

If you thought getting Christmas presents a few days late was a big problem then you may understand the plight of a few hundred people awaiting new plates for their car or truck.

It's taking close to a month to process those requests in El Paso County.

"Our goal is under 30 days and we're sitting at 25 days, right now, so definitely if you're over 30 days, we want to know about that," said Chuck Broerman, operations manager for El Paso County.

At the end of the day Jan. 7, the department was still processing title requests dated Dec. 17, 2013.

Broerman would not classify that as a lag in the title processing procedure because in Colorado there is a 60-day grace period before temporary tags expire.

The office is also seeing a 7 percent increase in demand for titles over last year. Broerman said if the demand for titles increases even more, the department is prepared to shift resources to "stay ahead of the curve."

"If you're having a concern about reaching that  deadline, give us a call sooner rather than later," said Broerman.

You can reach the El Paso County DMV office by calling 719-520-6240.

Meanwhile, Gov. John Hickenlooper announced plans to upgrade the Division of Motor Vehicles infrastructure statewide during his 2014 State of the State address.

"Our DMV has made great strides but they have done so with a computer system that is nearly three decades old," said Hickenlooper.

Broerman believes the upgrade from the DOS based system can only help streamline the process.

"There is, from time to time, glitches in the network and the system is down," said Broerman.

Charles Trimpey, of Circle Auto Center, said modernizing the system so dealers can access the state network could cut down on the clerical errors, like miscalculated sales tax, that can lead to a 60-day wait for permanent tags.

"It happens," said Trimpey. "But it's rare."

Trimpey believes errors in the title, like a missing date or conflicting information about the car, lead to a back and forth between the county DMV office and dealer ships that could take awhile as the title moves back and forth through the mail.

Even if Trimpey were to take a returned title to the office it will always be returned by the county through regular mail.

"It can be very time-consuming you have to block out an afternoon to go to the DMV to take care of title work," said Trimpey.

Hickenlooper believes investing millions of dollars into the computer system used by motor vehicle workers will help cut down on the wait times visitors see as well.

"This will reduce the average wait time in DMV offices from 60 minutes to 15," said Hickenlooper.

While wait times at state offices average about an hour according to the governor, Broerman said in El Paso County the wait time is just 17 minutes for driver's license requests. The average waiting time for title issues is about 40 minutes.

El Paso County serviced 498,066 customers through county DMV offices in 2013.

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