Colorado Springs
44° F
Clear
Clear
Advertisement

Ft. Carson mother warns national audience about 'choking game'

By Jonathan Petramala, Weekend Evening Anchor/Reporter, jonathan.petramala@krdo.com
Published On: Apr 04 2014 11:48:52 PM CDT
Updated On: Apr 05 2014 07:05:33 PM CDT

It’s Kristina Field’s most personal story. The last moments she shared with her son Luie, in a bathroom at Carson Middle School. He had just been found dead.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

It’s Kristina Field’s most personal story.  The last moments she shared with her son Luie, in a bathroom at Carson Middle School.  He had just been found dead.

"I was just waiting for him to open those beautiful eyes and say Mom, I'm ok.  But he didn't..." Fields told 20/20’s Elizabeth Vargas at a hotel in New York City.  It was a part of the national news magazine’s segment on what’s called the choking game.

 Fields says a producer with 20/20 called her after seeing her story on KRDO Newschannel 13 last month.  She says she jumped at the opportunity to raise awareness of the choking game on to a national audience.

 "If I would have had this information about this a year ago then my son could still be alive," Fields said.

Fields says her son Luie was found with a belt around his neck.  His death certificate reads suicide.  But an accidental voicemail left on her phone by her son a month before he died has led her to believe Luie died accidentally from the choking game.

“I can hear him panting in the beginning of the voicemail the same way you hear them on YouTube with the step-by-step videos and the friends playing it together,” Fields said.  She says she also hears her son talking to a friend about choking him.

“There was no reason for my son to commit suicide.  There was no note.  It doesn’t make sense,” Fields said.

Fountain-Fort Carson District 8 says that they don’t believe there is a choking game problem at their schools.

“They can say whatever they want but they’re just in denial and obviously don’t want to take responsibility,” Fields said.

Seven weeks after Luie’s death, Fields is frustrated because investigators aren’t sharing many details about her son’s final moments and what evidence they have.

“It’s been seven weeks today.  Seven weeks of pain, agony and no answers.  Nothing,” Fields said.

Advertisement