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Sister of man killed in hit-and-run believes new law would have helped solve case

By Michelle San Miguel, Multimedia Journalist - Pueblo Chieftain Bureau/Telemundo Anchor, michelle.sanmiguel@krdo.com
Published On: Mar 26 2014 09:54:27 PM CDT
Updated On: Mar 26 2014 11:54:21 PM CDT

New law aims to help catch hit and run suspects

PUEBLO, Colo. -

A sister still grieving after her brother was killed in a hit-and-run last year believes a new statewide alert could have helped find the driver who killed him.

Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a bill Tuesday that creates an emergency notification system for finding drivers involved in hit-and-runs that result in serious injuries or death. It's called a Medina Alert.

"It's going to be a year and it still seems like it was yesterday," said Corrine Martinez, whose brother was killed in a hit-and-run.

On April 18, 2013, Jose "Joe" Sisneros was crossing East Fourth Street and LaCrosse when he was struck and killed. 

"People usually stop when they hit an animal," Martinez said. "It wasn't an animal you hit and killed. It was my brother."

Police don't have a description of the vehicle or driver who killed Sisneros. But his sister believes had the alert been in place, it would have created a sense of urgency for drivers to be on the lookout for a heavily-damaged vehicle.  

Martinez said, "You know what you're going to be looking for. You know it's going to be a car. The color of it. The make of it."

The new law allows police to put that information on electronic highway signs, already used for Amber Alerts to notify the public when children are abducted.

"If it happens to somebody else, at least they will be able to have that hope of they can find whoever did that to their loved ones and it will help give them the closure," Martinez said.

But Martinez said she still doesn't have the closure she's wanted.

"We have no peace in our life right now," Martinez said. "We have no peace."

The law goes into effect Jan. 1. 

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