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State says ankle monitoring problems are fixed

By Jonathan Petramala, Weekend Evening Anchor/Reporter, jonathan.petramala@krdo.com
Published On: Jun 06 2013 11:19:48 PM CDT

The Colorado Department of Corrections says GPS tracking bracelet malfunctions and instillation problems on offenders have been corrected.

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. -

The Colorado Department of Corrections says GPS tracking bracelet malfunctions and instillation problems on offenders have been corrected.

One parolee who spoke with KRDO says he was having numerous problems with his bracelet.  Ironically, the offender was on parole for escape.  The DOC says there was a brief time they couldn’t track that offender because of the equipment malfunctioning.

“In one particular occasion we did lose track for a couple of hours, but walking him through it they were able to get it corrected,” said Shaun McGuire, a parole manager.

McGuire declined to reveal how many offenders were having problems with tracking equipment or what the problems were saying he didn’t want offenders to possibly learn how to manipulate the system.

He did indicate that some of the problems stemmed from a subcontractor not properly installing the ankle monitors on offenders.

“I even actually had the installer install the equipment on me so I can make sure they are properly installing the equipment on me so I can make sure they are properly installing the equipment and they know how it’s functioning and they’re doing it appropriately and in a manner that is going to be done right the first time,” McGuire said.

Another possible problem that McGuire says he is going to address with the subcontractor are about alleged instances of parolees left alone for several minutes in the instillation room.  The same offender who talked to KRDO about the equipment malfunction showed us a picture of an empty room as he waited for a new monitor.

“Everything I need to just take the monitor off and then put it back on is right there,” Justin said.

“I think it is a security issue,” McGuire said.  “Offenders should not be left alone with the equipment with the tools, but on the same side of that, if they were to grab tools and start using it on the equipment, it is going to signal some sort of alert so we’ll know to investigate it.”

That is if the equipment is working and installed correctly the first time.

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